Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, Series title: Modernity, Memory and Identity in South-East Europe

“This book explores and comparatively assesses how Armenians as minorities have been represented in modern Turkey from the twentieth century through to the present day, with a particular focus on the period since the first electoral victory of the AKP (Justice and Development Party) in 2002. It examines how social movements led by intellectuals and activists have challenged the Turkish state and called for democratization, and explores key issues related to Armenian identity. Drawing on new social movements theory, this book sheds light on the dynamics of minority identity politics in contemporary Turkey and highlights the importance of political protest.”

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Revisiting Armenians in the Ottoman Empire: Deportations and Atrocities
  • From Ottoman Millet to Turkish Citizens: 1923–2002
  • Hopes and Loss of Democratization Under AKP Government: From 2002 Onward
  • Challenging the Turkish State’s Denial of the Armenian Genocide

Özlem Belçim Galip is Marie Curie Fellow at the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Oxford, UK.